I don't know what to do with this blog....

kyletwebster:

** REBLOG AND WIN ** The Ultimate Megapack for Photoshop has been updated and now contains over 100 brushes for the same discounted price as the original pack. 

This is my best-selling set and it includes a wide range of incredibly realistic pencils, inks, gouache, oil and acrylic brushes, as well as some FX brushes, erasers, blenders and smudge tools. There is even a perspective grid brush.

THREE random Tumblr followers who reblog this post will win a free Megapack on Sunday, March 30th (Value: $13).

Thanks for the support, artist friends, and happy painting to all!

daisyshanti:

patsta:

dietmountaindelrey:

spaceoid:

Two childhood friends unexpectedly reunite on opposite sides of a demonstration in 1972

Just imagine the pain…

This is such an amazing photograph

Oh my god ..

daisyshanti:

patsta:

dietmountaindelrey:

spaceoid:

Two childhood friends unexpectedly reunite on opposite sides of a demonstration in 1972

Just imagine the pain…

This is such an amazing photograph

Oh my god ..

art-of-swords:

[ NEWS ] Real version of mythical anime Sword discovered in Japan
In the Rurouni Kenshin manga and anime, there’s a reverse-blade sword called "sakabato". An old, real-life version of this fictional sword was apparently discovered in Japan.
Last October, what’s being compared to a real sakabato turned up in an old family storage cellar, located in Chiba Prefecture’s Shiroi City, that dates from the Edo Period (1603 to 1868).
Asahi News reports that the entire weapon, a “kogatana” (小刀) or “short katana,” was covered in rust and measures 11 inches, with the blade measuring 8.6 inches. This reverse-blade, which is also covered with dragon engravings, is different from traditional Japanese swords.
For Japanese swords, the outside of the blade is sharpened. But, as this sword, the fictional sakabato differs in that the inside of the blade is sharp and the outside of the blade is dull. Apparently, this makes the sword brutally deadly.
Supposedly, there was a rare reverse-blade tanto (dagger) called a “kubikiri” or “head cutter.” That blade, however, had no point—unlike this latest find. The Asahi News report appears to indicate that the newly discovered short sword is different and even compares the short sword to Rurouni Kenshin’s fictional blade.
While there are contemporary sakabato for collectors, there’s no record of the sword actually appearing in Japanese history. Until now, it seems there’s been no such record of a similar sword. Thus, that makes the discovery of what’s apparently an actual reverse-blade all the more interesting.
The reverse-blade has been donated to the prefecture’s cultural archive.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Kotaku

art-of-swords:

[ NEWS ] Real version of mythical anime Sword discovered in Japan

In the Rurouni Kenshin manga and anime, there’s a reverse-blade sword called "sakabato". An old, real-life version of this fictional sword was apparently discovered in Japan.

Last October, what’s being compared to a real sakabato turned up in an old family storage cellar, located in Chiba Prefecture’s Shiroi City, that dates from the Edo Period (1603 to 1868).

Asahi News reports that the entire weapon, a “kogatana” (小刀) or “short katana,” was covered in rust and measures 11 inches, with the blade measuring 8.6 inches. This reverse-blade, which is also covered with dragon engravings, is different from traditional Japanese swords.

For Japanese swords, the outside of the blade is sharpened. But, as this sword, the fictional sakabato differs in that the inside of the blade is sharp and the outside of the blade is dull. Apparently, this makes the sword brutally deadly.

Supposedly, there was a rare reverse-blade tanto (dagger) called a “kubikiri” or “head cutter.” That blade, however, had no point—unlike this latest find. The Asahi News report appears to indicate that the newly discovered short sword is different and even compares the short sword to Rurouni Kenshin’s fictional blade.

While there are contemporary sakabato for collectors, there’s no record of the sword actually appearing in Japanese history. Until now, it seems there’s been no such record of a similar sword. Thus, that makes the discovery of what’s apparently an actual reverse-blade all the more interesting.

The reverse-blade has been donated to the prefecture’s cultural archive.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Kotaku

lxny:

mspbandj:

bangarangn1tram:

this is beautful im downloading it and putting it on my phone

THIS IS MY POST LOOK AT THIS ISN’T IT COOL

(Source: slammajammadingdong)

(Source: tomburke)

(Source: selfhelpful)

art-of-swords:

Miniature Ottoman Gem-set Dagger

  • Dated: 19th century
  • Medium: steel, green glass, rubies, emeralds, gold, velvet,
  • Place of Origin: Turkey
  • Measurements: 11.7 cm. long

This miniature dagger is based on a 17th century prototype, an emerald-hilted example of which can be seen in the collection of Topkapi Saray, Istanbul, inv. no. 2/ 152. The dagger features a green glass hilt with quillons set with rubies and emeralds, the gold damascened blade features an inscription.

The gilt scabbard is set with further rubies and emeralds and chased to depict a trailing vine, verso with a trailing vine and scale design chape. The suspension loop comes with a chain with faceted sections and green glass beads, in original fitted velvet box with the tughra of HIH Princess ‘Adile Sultana (1825-1898).

Sidenotes:

  1. Princess ‘Adile Sultana (1825 -1898) or HIH Princess ‘Adile Sultana (Turkish: Adile Sultan) was the daughter of Sultan Mahmud II (1785-1839) and sister of the Sultans Abdulmecid I and Abdulaziz. She was an Ottoman princess, a renowned female Diwan poet and a philanthropist.
  2. Born in Constantinople, Adile Sultana lost her mother at a very young age, and was raised by Nevfidan Kadin, the chief sultana in the palace. She received a high standard of education and was, like her father, very interested in the arts.
  3. In 1845, Adile Sultana married the commander of the fleet Kapudan-i Derya Mehmed Ali Pasha, who served briefly as Grand Vizier to Sultan Abdulmecid (1823-1861).
  4. She lost her three children and later her husband in 1868. In deep mourning, she entered the order of Naqshbandi and devoted herself to charitable activities before her death in 1898. She was interned in the mausoleum of her husband in Eyüp, Istanbul. 
  5. Adile Sultana’s literary works were as successful as those of Leyla Hanim and Fitnat Hanim, two renowned female poets of her era. However, her works are important as they shed light on palace life and the administration of the Ottoman Empire.
  6. She composed a poem about the murder of her younger brother Sultan Abdulaziz (1830-1876), officially deemed a suicide. She also assisted in publishing the printed version of the Divan of Suleyman the Magnificent (1494-1566). A compilation of her poetry ‘Adile Sultan’s Divan was published in 1996.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Bonhams